Attractions
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Hutton's Unconformity Sculpture


A stone sculpture by Max Nowell at Lothian Park celebrates the discovery of James Hutton and is one of the most important geological sites in the world.

James Hutton, a farmer and doctor from Duns in Berwickshire, conceived a theory about the formation of the Earth based upon what he saw in the geological formation of the ground on Arran, at Siccar Point on the Berwickshire coast and here at Inchbonny. Whilst visiting Allar's Mill on the Jed Water, Hutton was delighted to see horizontal bands of red sandstone lying 'unconformably' on top of near vertical and folded bands of rock. He published his "Theory of the Earth" in 1788 and has since become known as the 'founding father' of modern geology.

Web: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Hutton

The Capon Tree


 

The Capon Tree, estimated to be at least 500 years, is a Sessile Oak (Quercus petraea), and one of the few remaining trees from the ancient Jed Forest, the existence of which was first noted in 1317. It is a Heritage Tree and Tree of National Special interest in the Ancient Tree Inventory of the Woodland Trust, listed as one of Great Britain’s 50 greatest trees by The Tree Council, and recognised as an important historic tree by the Borders Forest Trust. 

There is no parking directly next to The Capon Tree, but can be walked to from the main town.

Jedburgh Castle Jail and Museum


Jedburgh Castle Jail's distinctive crennelated walls and towers give every appearance of being a model of peaceful solidity.

But its lofty location overlooking the town, on what was once known as Gallows Hill, tells a very different story - of a bloody past and a very spooky present indeed.

It is regularly booked for ghost hunt nights but during the daytime opening hours Jedburgh Castle and Jail is home to displays charting the town's history and its most famous citizens as well as hosting travelling exhibitions.

The Castle and Jail has limited parking and entrance is free.

Phone: 01835 864750
Web: https://www.liveborders.org.uk/culture/museums/our-museums/jedburgh-castle-jail-and-museum/

Jedburgh Abbey


If ancient stone walls could whisper, what tales Jedburgh Abbey could tell.

The magnificent building dominating the Southern approaches to the town has been at the heart of local life for almost 900 years. Explore the grounds and museum of one of the grandest Abbey's in Scotland.

Free Parking is available nearby where a picnic area on the banks of the Jed Water provides a magnificent view of the abbey.

Phone: 01835 863925
Web: www.historicenvironment.scot/visit-a-place/places/jedburgh-abbey

Mary Queen of Scots Visitor Centre


As epitaphs go, Mary Queen of Scots' - "Would that I had died in Jedburgh" - neatly sums up the despair of a tragic life.

Her story unfolds on several floors at Mary Queen of Scots House, one of Jedburgh's most popular tourist attractions. Exhibits include Mary's death mask, said to have been taken following her execution at Fortheringay Castle in 1587.

The house is set in pleasant landscaped gardens and entrance is free.

Phone: 01835 863331
Web: www.visitscotland.com/info/see-do/mary-queen-of-scots-visitor-centre-p253091

Jacksons At Jedburgh


Your experience at the Jackson’s family farm is all about heading away from your usual daily bustle and entering into a world of slow living. Experiencing the seasonal rhythm of farming life is something that can relax even the most cluttered of minds.

Phone: 07980845712
Web: https://www.jacksonsatjedburgh.co.uk/